Tell local media outlet to respect transgender people

Local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering subjects and sources. That’s why we’re asking CREDO activists to start their own petitions telling media outlets in their cities to take a proactive step towards reporting practices that respect transgender people.

By working in your own community and targeting local media, you can make change right at home. Will you start a petition targeting your local newspaper, TV station or radio station? We’ll provide sample language that you can customize as you see fit.

Trans respect 300
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Campaigns (9)

  • Tell KARE 11, WCCO and KSTP: Respect transgender people
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking KARE 11, WCCO and KSTP to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    673 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Gaius Poehler
  • Tell Fox News: Respect transgender people
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking Fox News to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Bruno Prata Picture
  • Tell the Pittsburgh Tribune Review: Respect transgender people
    Faith, Hope and Love ~ But the greatest of these is love (1 Corinthians 13). Even if you are not a believer, and especially if you ARE, you must follow this example. People must check their brains and not their emotions, to search for the reason behind the hostility that disregards respect toward those who don't live their lives as you may. How can some states _suggest_ they have Christian ideals, when last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states? Did they forget that being a Christian means following in the footsteps of Christ? If Americans wish to consider themselves the greatest, they should act like it, and not follow the angry and insecure among us. We, as intelligent thinking adults, have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. Where do some people get the nerve, trying to enforce their opinion on others regarding their private behavior? A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking The Tribune Review to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    1 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Charlene Rush
  • Tell KDKA TV & Radio: Gender pronouns are important
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking KDKA TV & RADIO to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    299 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Bob Poropatich Picture
  • Tell The Denver Post: Commit to confirming pronouns, every time
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking The Denver Post to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    649 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Phil Tatro Picture
  • Tell the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Respect transgender people
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    223 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Robert Whitney Picture
  • Tell the Bristol Herald Courier: Respect transgender people
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking the Bristol Herald Courier to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    67 of 100 Signatures
    Created by John Davis
  • Tell the Boston Globe: Respect transgender people
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking the Boston Globe to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    913 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Judith Rosen Picture
  • Tell the Arizona Republic: Respect transgender people
    Last year a wave of over 100 pieces of anti-LGBTQ legislation swept across 22 states. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and allies pushed back across the country to say: We won’t stand for bigotry and hate in our communities. But being on the defensive is not enough – we also have to proactively work to make systemic and cultural changes that support and affirm LGBTQ people. A crucial way for our communities to be more inclusive is to acknowledge and affirm that every person has the right to define their own gender and to be referred to using their correct gender pronouns. Referring to someone using incorrect gender pronouns — misgendering them — contributes to the violence and oppression that people in the transgender community face every day. That’s why I’m asking The Arizona Republic to implement a policy that requires reporters to confirm gender pronouns with every source and subject as part of basic fact-checking procedures. Across the country, local media sources are some of the worst offenders when it comes to misgendering of subjects and sources, and we can hold our local media to a higher standard. Referring to someone by an incorrect gender pronoun not only perpetuates anti-trans bigotry and hate, it’s bad journalism. Journalists should report facts, not assumptions. Misgendering doesn’t just happen to transgender people; it happens to people whose names are unfamiliar, gender-neutral, or derived from a language other than English, and people whose voices or facial features are not immediately identifiable as male or female. Using a person’s correct gender pronoun is basic to journalistic accuracy and is simple to make part of standard fact-checking procedures. And for transgender and gender nonconforming people, it is a basic facet of respect that is too often denied. In the case of smaller media outlets, it most often happens in the most heartbreaking and sensitive situation: when a transgender woman is murdered.[1] Every person has the right to define their own gender, and media outlets have a responsibility to use people’s correct pronouns. CITATIONS: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/08/police-need-work-their-approach-homicides-transgender-people
    780 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Cordell Lee Picture